For the University of Chicago School of Medicine Class of 1964 

All of these photos are from the University of Chicago Photographic Archive. The approximate dates of the photographs are given when known. The image identifier number of each of the photos is provided to comply with the terms of the copyright holder. 

Commentary by Robert Roskoski Jr. Class of 1964
Albert Merritt Billings Hospital
Coolidge & Hodgdon
1927
950 E. 59th Street | University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
A23
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-00784
Abbott Memorial Hall
Coolidge & Hodgdon
1927
947-951 E. 58th Street | University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
A15
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-00031
Anatomy Laboratory
Cobb, Henry Ives, 1859-1931
1897
1027 E. 57th Street | University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
D06
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-00314
Anatomy Building
Cobb, Henry Ives, 1859-1931
1897
1027 E. 57th Street | University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
D06
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-00305

Bobs Roberts Rotunda. I saw my first patient here during the second semester of sophomore year during our introduction to clinical medicine. The male boy in the so-called "well-baby" clinic had a history of Osgood-Schlatter disease. I was distraught because I had studied so hard (I thought) and my first "patient" had a disease that I'd never heard of. How could this be? Although I had read Robbin's Pathology from cover-to-cover, it wasn't mentioned. Fortunately this benign disorder was included in Nelson's Textbook of Pediatrics, which I read in the rotunda at the time and I began to slowly recover from my intellectual shortcoming. Afterwards, I went back to Steiner's lab in biochemistry where I was also a student and told a technician (Judy King) about this incident. It turned out that she knew all about this disease because she had also suffered from it as a child: Osgood-Schlatter, two; Roskoski, zero. In case you can find a copy of Nelson's Text circa 1962, check the index for the entry entitled "Birds, for the, pp. 1-1137", which was provided by Nelson's daughter. The chief editor of the current Robbins textbook is Vinay Kumar, Chairman of Pathology, University of Chicago.

Coolidge & Hodgdon
1930
920 E. 59th Street | University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
A24
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-00939
Chicago Lying In Hospital
1931
5841 S. Maryland Avenue | University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
A27
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-01524

Bobs Roberts Hospital

1930
920 E. 59th Street | University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
A24
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-00960

Marc Oliver Beem, Professor of Pediatrics; note that Archie Lieberman was our class photographer

Lieberman, Archie, 1926-2008
1963
Photographic prints; 34.1 x 22.6 cm
Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf1-00488
 

Emmett Bay, Professor of Medicine, who gave the first lecture during our orientation in which he emphasized the importance of basic science in the practice of medicine.

1964-11-25
Photographic prints; 22.8 x 19.2 cm
Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf1-00383
Albert Dorfman, Professor of Pediatrics and Biochemistry
apf1-05846

Earl A. Evans Jr., Lowell T. Coggeshall, Unidentified. Evans was the Chairman of Biochemistry during our biochemistry sojourn in Abbott Hall

apf1-05997

Melvin L. Griem, Professor of Radiology, holding a chromium wire implantation gun. He always claimed that the U of C survival statistics were better than Mayo's. 

apf7-00327

Charles Huggins (Professor of Surgery) and Elwood V. Jensen (Ben May Laboratory for Cancer Research). Huggins won the Nobel Prize in 1966 for the interrelationship of cancer and hormones initially published in 1941 and Jensen discovered the estrogen receptor. Surprisingly, the existence of the estrogen receptor was not immediately accepted by the scientific community and Jensen published his initial studies in 3rd rate journals because no one else would accept them. They are standing in from of a Packard Tri-Carb liquid scintillation counter. For vignettes on Huggins, click here and here

ca. 1972
Photographic prints; 19.2 x 24.1 cm
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf1-02909

John Forbes Perkins Jr. (seated center), Professor of Physiology, who taught cardiovascular physiology. He's with the oximeter that he invented. 

1956
Photographic prints; 11.6 x 16.2 cm
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf2-036

Lloyd M. Kozloff, Professor of Biochemistry, seated at his electron microscope.

apf1-03551

Ann Miller Lawrence, Professor of Medicine, Endocrinology. When Leon Jacobson introduced her at grand rounds, he always managed to put his arm around her as he attached a microphone.

1965-04
Photographic prints; 15.9 x 11.2 cm
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf1-03690

Charles P. McCartney, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

apf1-04175
Zelma Molnar (Pathology)
apf1-00885

Henry Russe, Professor of Medicine

apf7-01154

Murray Rabinowitz, Professor of Biochemistry. Rabinowitz, Samuel Weiss, and Irving Goldberg (all on the U of C Biochemistry faculty at the time we were there)  did post-doctoral work with Fritz Lipmann at the Rockefeller University about 10 years before me. Lipmann won the Nobel Prize for discovering coenzyme A and shared the Prize with Hans Aldoph Krebs (1953). One needs acetyl-CoA as a two-carbon donor to enter the Krebs cycle and how this occurred was unknown until Lipmann provided the missing link (acetyl-CoA), which is required to sustain the pathway. 

apf7-00484

Janet Rowley, the Blum-Riese Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. She had to wait a year to be admitted to the Medical School owing to a quota of three women per class. As a young faculty person, Leon Jacobson gave her a small office in the Department of Medicine and paid her enough money so that she could hire a baby sitter. Subsequently, she elucidated the nature of the Philadelphia chromosome that is seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia and became one of the most influential faculty members at the Medical School with an international reputation. 

1980s
Photographic prints; 16.7 x 21.6 cm
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
Rights and Reproductions Copyright held by Chicago Maroon
apf7-01134

Albert Potts (Professor of Ophthalmology)

apf7-00437

Olaf Skinsnes, Professor of Pathology. Some thought that his lectures on leprosy were among the best that we had. He received both the MD and PhD from the University.

apf1-07669

Stanley Yachnin, Professor of Medicine

apf7-01644-002

Donald F. Steiner, Professor of Biochemistry and discoverer of proinsulin. The sign on the amino acid analyzer reads "We never make mistakes." If you right click on any photo on this page and select "view image", you will see an enlarged version. Then click return to get back to this page. As the Chair of Biochemistry in the 1970s, a sign posted on his door read: "Be reasonable; do it my way." For a commentary on his life, click here

1977
Photographic prints; 16.5 x 21.7 cm
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
Rights and Reproductions Copyright held by Chicago Maroon
apf7-01325

Howard Guy Williams-Ashman (seated on the right), Professor of Biochemistry and member of the Ben May Laboratory for Cancer Research, sitting with Maurice Goldblatt of Goldblatt stores. Goldblatt donated the funds for the Goldblatt Pavilion. When Goldblatt was a patient he encountered a long wait while getting an X-ray. He supported the Medical School because he was happy to be treated like an ordinary person, not a VIP. 

apf7-01589
Phillip W. Graff, Professor of Pathology
apf1-06482

Benjamin Spargo's Lab, Department of Pathology (1957). Abdollah Sadeghi-Nejad received his MS degree under the tutelage of Dr. Spargo in 1964. Too bad the Archives lacks a photo of Dr. Spargo at his electron microscope.

apf2-03652
Paul Vincent Harper Jr., Grandson of the first President of the University and Professor of Surgery and Radiology
apf1-02464
John H. Rust, Professor of Pharmacology and Radiology
apf7-01157

 

Cancer Research Foundation headed by Dr. Charles B. Huggins. The Committee on Cancer is a group of scientists who will direct the University of Chicago 's tremendous assault on cancer. Standing, left to right: Dr. Paul C. Hodges, Prof. Albert L. Lehninger, Prof. John Hutchens, Dr. M. Edward Davis, Dr. Leon O. Jacobson, Prof. Harold C. Urey, and Prof. Carl R. Moore. Seated: Dr. Lowell T. Coggeshall, Dr. Anna Hamann, Dr. Charles B. Huggins, Dr. James Franck and Dr. E. S. Guzman-Barron. 

Harold C. Urey received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934 for the discovery of deuterium. He was associated with the Manhattan Project and was a member of the University of Chicago Chemistry Department in the late 1940s and early 1950s. 

Unknown to most of us, Coggeshall was an expert on tropical diseases including malaria and he made significant contribution to the war efforts (WWII). In early life and by his own account, he was quite lazy. He was reared on a farm in Saratoga, Indiana and did all he could to avoid work. He was second in his class in high school (the class that consisted of two students). It was not until later in college that he found work that interested him, which began with field studies in zoology. His heretofore mediocre grades became A's and he graduated Phi Beta Kappa. Coggeshall learned his field of malaria in the American South, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, in the 1920s while still in college. He started graduate school in zoology at Indiana University, but he changed and graduated from its medical school. He became an intern at the newly opened Billings Hospital (1928) at the University of Chicago as a result of pure chance. He planned to continue his malaria work at a hospital in Central America following graduaton. However, a tropical hurricane destroyed the hospital just before he was to leave for Central America. Coggeshall wrote "On Saturday night I found that I couldn't go to Central America, and Sunday night I found that this [Billings] hospital was opening, so I got on the train and Monday morning I was there." He thought he would stay for six months, but stayed for six years. 

His subsequent varied career in medical research, public health, hospital administration and clinical practice was turned back to malaria by the necessities of the war. He spent time in Africa trying to keep the airfields used by transport planes (flying via South America to avoid German fire in the North Atlantic) free from the disease. He sat on several committees trying to coordinate the research and preventive programs for the military and entered the naval medical services for a time. He ended the war looking after a large hospital devoted to testing drugs and rehabilitating soldiers with chronic malaria and other traumas of the conflict. Afterwards Coggeshall was Chair of the Department of Medicine at University of Chicago from 1946-1949 and was the Dean of the Division of Biological Sciences from 1947-1960. All of this is chronicled in the book entitled "The Malaria Project: The US Government's Secret Mission to Find a Miracle Cure" by Karen M. Masterson (2014) about malaria research during WWII. And there is no doubt about it, Coggeshall is the main character in the book. Despite these accomplishments, Wikipedia does not have a page on him. Happily, Masterson is planning to pen such a page (guess who urged her to do so). 

Masterson describes Alf Alving as a pleasant and likable nephrologist at the University of Chicago who was also instrumental in developing treatments for malaria. Alving worked with prisoners in the Stateville Correctional Center (Crest Hill, IL) who were admitted to the hospital ward in studies during the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. Of the many drugs tested, Alving performed the first studies with primaquine, which is still used for the treatment of malaria and is now used for the treatment of pneumocystis pneumonia. He had many subjects in the autumn during baseball's world series when they volunteered for various treatments so they could keep track of the baseball results (even before the age of television). One of Alving's inmate assistants was Nathan Leopold, one of the two famous killers of Leopold-Loeb fame. These two University of Chicago students from wealthy families murdered Bobby Franks in 1924 and were interred in Stateville (Richard Loeb was stabbed with his own razor by an inmate in 1936 after Loeb made improper sexual advances). Although Leopold was just another murderer among many, he was efficient and technically reliable. Furthermore, he held great sway over most of the other inmates and fostered their collaboration and cooperation on Alving's malaria project. 

Among Alving's collaborators were two of our teachers in the Department of Medicine (Nephrology): Theodore N Pullman (Terrible Ted) and John Arnold. In contrast to the likable Alving, we recall that these two men constantly berated each other in public. For reasons that are unclear, Pullman invariably regaled us on rounds with his knowledge of electron spin resonance despite a lack of relevance to pertinent medical issues. Pullman had a nice trick to gain our attention in the darkened lecture hall during soporific noon lectures. While quietly pacing back an forth, he would suddenly whack the podium with a yard stick and observe innumerable startle responses. One favorite piece of his advice was to keep your patients out of the hands of surgeons. As Pullman suffered from back pain, he desperately tried to convince the orthopedists to operate. However, they got their revenge and refused. 

Chicago Daily News
1947-10-21
Photographic prints; 19.0 x 24.0 cm
University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Archival Photographic Files
University of Chicago Library, Special Collections Research Center
apf3-00291
 

All of these photos are from the University of Chicago Photographic Archive, which can be accessed via http://photoarchive.lib.uchicago.edu/

Page design and commentary by Robert Roskoski Jr. who can be contacted at robertr@brimr.org with any corrections.

For other photos pertaining to the University of Chicago School of Medicine Class of 1964 faculty, click here. For photos of the 45th Class reunion, click here. For photos of the 50th class reunion, click here.

Created 08 May 2015; updated 1 June 2015